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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

1 edition of Demand for money in developing countries found in the catalog.

Demand for money in developing countries

Demand for money in developing countries

assessing the role of financial innovation

  • 329 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by World Bank in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Developing countries
    • Subjects:
    • Demand for money -- Developing countries -- Econometric models.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementPatricio Arrau ... [et al.].
      SeriesPolicy, research, and external affairs working papers ;, WPS 721
      ContributionsArrau, Patricio.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHG1496 .D46 1991
      The Physical Object
      Pagination37 p. :
      Number of Pages37
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1772748M
      LC Control Number92126219

      Further, it presents estimates of a common specification of money demand across a range of developing countries. One of the interesting contributions of the book is to give more serious attention to developing economies and to more recent empirical studies than previous studies had done. Chapter 3. The Money Demand Function Introduction In the previous chapter, we used a regression method to examine the quantitative importance of the potential macroeconomic variables in the conduct of the monetary policies in each country. In other words, we were concerned with the objectives of the monetary policies in these Size: KB.

      The demand for money in developing countries: assessing the role of financial innovation (Английский) Аннотация. Traditional specifications of money demand have commonly been plagued by persistent overprediction, implausible parameter estimates, and highly autocorrelated by: CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): In this paper, we applied alternative time series techniques and obtained similar summaries of demand for money relations for twelve developing countries. This indicates that adequate attention should be paid to the purpose of research and interpretation of results rather than to econometric techniques.

      theories on the demand for money hence regarded as the father of modern theories of money demand. This paper examines the contribution of various schools of thought in economist on the demand for money. The study then examines the relevance of the determinants of the demand for money in developed and developing countries.   In this paper we try to inestigate the effects of effective exchange rates of developing countries on their demand for money. Previous authors who have estimated a money demand function, inclusive of an exchange rate variable (bilateral or effective), have restricted themselves to industrial countries by:


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Demand for money in developing countries Download PDF EPUB FB2

Demand for Money in Developing Countries: Alternative Estimates and Policy Implications (Economic Issues, Problems and Perspectives) UK ed. Edition. The Paperback of the Demand for Money in Developing Countries, The: Alternative Estimates and Policy Implications by Saten Kumar at Barnes & Noble.

Due to COVID, orders may be delayed. Thank you for your : Saten Kumar. We estimate money demand for ten developing countries employing various proxies for the innovation process and provide an assessment of the relative importance of this variable. We find that financial innovation plays an important role in determining money demand and its fluctuations, and that the importance of this role increases with the rate of inflation.

Buy Demand For Money In Developing Countries Book at Easons This publication presents some empirical analysis on the demand for money. It covers a wide range of papers on econometric techniques and on previous empirical work on money demand.

Further, it presents estimates of a common specification of money deman. Further, it presents estimates of a common specification of money demand across a range of developing countries. One of the interesting contributions of the book is to give more serious attention to developing economies and to more recent empirical studies than previous studies have done.

Traditional specifications of money demand have been commonly plagued by persistent overprediction, implausible parameter estimates, and highly autocorrelated errors. This paper argues that some of those problems stem from the failure to account for the impact of financial innovation.

We estimate money demand for ten developing countries employing various proxies for the innovation Cited by: 1. The demand for money is a critical component in the formulation of monetary policy, and a stable demand function for money has long been perceived as a prerequisite for the use of monetary.

The process of money creation and the demand for money 5. Macroeconomic policy in an open economy 6. Current account and asset demand approaches to balance of payments Part 2: Macroeconomic Models of Developing Countries 7.

IMF type macro models for developing countries 8. A structuralist macros model for developing countries 9. estimate money demand for ten developing countries employing various proxies for the innovation process and provide an assessment of the relative importance of this variable.

We find that financial innovation plays an important role in determining money demand and its fluctuations, and that. This paper examines the relative demands for domestic and foreign currency deposits by residents of developing countries.

A dynamic currency substitution model that incorporates forward-looking rational expectations is formulated and then estimated for a group of ten developing countries. The results indicate that the foreign rate of interest and the expected rate of depreciation of the Author: Mohsin S.

Khan, Pierre-Richard Agénor. The demand for money in developing countries: Assessing the role of financial innovation. The demand for money in developing countries: assessing the role of financial innovation (English) Abstract.

Traditional specifications of money demand have commonly been plagued by persistent overprediction, implausible parameter estimates, and highly autocorrelated by: Traditional specifications of money demand have been commonly plagU4:!d by persistent overprediction, implausible parameter estimates, and highly autocorrelated errors.

This paper argues that some of those problems stem from the failure to account for the impact of financial innovation. We estimate money demand for ten developing countries employing various proxies for the innovation.

The demand for money in developing countries: Assessing the role of financial innovation Patricio Arrau, José De Gregorio a,c, Carmen M.

Reinhart c, Peter Wickham. This book, Money Demand Function in a Developing Economy: The Nigeria’s Experience, provides a comprehensive analysis of what really constitutes the money demand function in a developing economy like Nigeria.

It offers a good balance between theory and empirical. That is, it provides an avenue for empirical testing of theories and models as Author: Emeka Nkoro, Aham Kelvin Uko.

This chapter discusses the effects of banking development on demand for money. The pace of economic growth and development of developing countries is greatly influenced by their monetary conditions. Monetary conditions in these countries, in turn, are affected by the development.

Journal of Monetary Economics 3 () n North-Holland Publishing Company DEMAND FOR MONEY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES Some theoretical and empirical results Chorng-huey WONG* International Monetary Fund, Washington, DCby: Downloadable (with restrictions). Traditional specifications of money demand have commonly been plagued by persistent overprediction, implausible parameter estimates, andhighly autocorrelated errors.

The authors argue that some of these problems stem from the failure to account for the impact of financial innovation. They estimate money demand for ten developing countries, using various. In this article we examine money demand issues using cross-country data, for 48 countries over the period.

In particular, we investigate conventional money demand functions, for both narrow and broad aggregates, and the role that insti-tutions, –nancial structure, and –nancial development may have in the demand for money.

The Demand for money in developing countries: assessing the role of financial innovation. Darrat, A. F. (b) Monetarization and Stability of Money Demand in Developing Countries: The Latin America Case’, Savings and Development, 1, 59–72 Google Scholar Darrat, A.

F. and Webb, M. A. () ‘Financial Changes and Interest Elasticity of Money Demand: Further Tests of the Gurley and Shaw Thesis’, Journal of Development Cited by: 4.Previous studies that estimated the money demand function in Asian developing countries either employed traditional estimation techniques or recently popularized cointegration technique.

While the first group suffers from 'spurious regression' problems, the second group interpreted their finding of cointegration as a sign of stability of estimated parameters.This paper examines the relative demands for domestic and foreign currency deposits by residents of developing countries.

A dynamic currency substitution model that incorporates forward-looking rational expectations is formulated and then estimated for a group of ten developing countries.

The results indicate that the foreign rate of interest and the expected rate of depreciation of the.